NextLevel Law P.C

PLEASE NOTE: NextLevel Law, P.C. by Daniel R. Hernandez, Esq. remains open and available to serve you during the COVID-19 crisis. We are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or video conference. Please call our office to discuss your options.

PLEASE NOTE: NextLevel Law, P.C. by Daniel R. Hernandez, Esq. remains open and available to serve you during the COVID-19 crisis. We are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or video conference. Please call our office to discuss your options.

When you’re going through a divorce and trying to work through child custody matters, you might assume that you’ll be free to live your life as you want as long as you’re not doing anything illegal. This might not be the case. It is possible for the court to review specific aspects of your life to determine whether those are in the child’s best interests.

In some cases, the sexuality of the parent is what comes into question. This is often the case if one parent has realized that they aren’t heterosexual. The other parent might not want the children exposed to other types of love. They might use a religious objection to this lifestyle. Learning a bit about what options you have if you’re facing this might be helpful.

One thing that you must do is carefully consider every term you agree to during the child custody negotiations. It’s especially important that you review the parenting plan and divorce documents you sign to determine whether they accurately reflect what you agreed to.

For some individuals, particularly those who were in an ultra-religious marriage, having to keep up with those ideals might be part of what your ex pushes for in custody. This could mean that you have to curtail certain aspects of your life when the children are around. You’d still be free to be yourself when they are with your ex.

It’s a shame that some parents are forced to choose in this manner. You should be free to be the person you truly are. Working with an attorney who is familiar with lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights and similar matters might benefit you if you’re concerned about how your love life might affect custody.