NextLevel Law P.C

PLEASE NOTE: NextLevel Law, P.C. by Daniel R. Hernandez, Esq. remains open and available to serve you during the COVID-19 crisis. We are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or video conference. Please call our office to discuss your options.

PLEASE NOTE: NextLevel Law, P.C. by Daniel R. Hernandez, Esq. remains open and available to serve you during the COVID-19 crisis. We are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or video conference. Please call our office to discuss your options.

LGBTQ discrimination impacts a quarter of the population group

On Behalf of | Apr 5, 2021 | LGBTQ Law |

In many ways, such as the widespread legalization of same-sex marriage, it is clear that the United States is growing more accommodating to the LGBTQ community.

However, it’s also obvious that not everyone in the country is on board with these changes, and LGBTQ discrimination is still common. In fact, some reports have claimed that it impacts right around 25% of the population group, or one out of every four. This discrimination can be in medical care, employment, education and many other areas. 

Two key statistics to consider about LGBTQ discrimination

To see just how common the problem of LGBTQ discrimination really is, let’s take a quick look at two key statistics regarding such discrimination in the workplace:

  1. When asked if their sexual orientation meant that a promotion they deserved went to someone else, anywhere from 11 to 28% of LGBTQ workers said that this had happened to them.
  2. When asked if they had not gotten a job, not gotten a promotion or even actively been fired, around 27% of employees who identified as transgender said that this had occurred in the previous year alone.

Not only do these statistics show how many people are impacted by these issues, but the time limitations also show how common it is. If more than a quarter of LGBTQ workers have been discriminated against in the last 12 months, how many more have seen it in the last two years, five years or ten years? How many workers have seen it repeatedly in their lives? 

Despite the positive changes in the last few years toward the LGBTQ community, discrimination still happens much more than many people assume. Those who are victimized by workplace discrimination need to know what options they have to fight back. Speaking with an experienced advocate who understand your concerns can help you figure out your next move.