NextLevel Law P.C

PLEASE NOTE: NextLevel Law, P.C. by Daniel R. Hernandez, Esq. remains open and available to serve you during the COVID-19 crisis. We are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or video conference. Please call our office to discuss your options.

PLEASE NOTE: NextLevel Law, P.C. by Daniel R. Hernandez, Esq. remains open and available to serve you during the COVID-19 crisis. We are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or video conference. Please call our office to discuss your options.

LGTBQ discrimination breaks federal and Illinois laws

On Behalf of | Nov 22, 2021 | LGBTQ Law |

As a member of the LGTBQ community, you contribute to Chicago. You know you are welcome in your community. Yet, you may face both subtle and blatant forms of prejudice in your workplace.

After you came out, you may have known that you would experience discrimination. This knowledge may not make the pain of exclusion any less sharp. 

Your sexual identity cannot be a basis for discrimination

Under Illinois law, your sexual identity cannot be a basis for denying your civil rights.

This type of discrimination may happen in any environment—your workplace, a medical facility, retail store or even a house of worship. You know discrimination against you and members of your community is illegal. Learning more about how you can pursue justice may put you into a stronger position.

Facing sexual orientation discrimination at work

You may be able to sue your employer by using a civil rights law. Title VII forbids workplace discrimination based on your sexual identity, both perceived and actual. Your sexual identity places you in a protected class, just as Blacks, Hispanics and Asian-Americans reside in their own protected class.

Do not sit back and try to keep the peace. You have several pathways to take to right the wrongs you have experienced.

How new laws are protecting LGTBQ individuals

New laws have been written and signed into law. Some of these laws have been challenged, which resulted in the Supreme Court ruling for LGTBQ individuals.

Support for gender identity as an individual privacy right is growing stronger at the state and federal level, including the Supreme Court.